The FASTEST Way to Understand 19 SLAVIC Languages

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Polyglot Dreams

Polyglot Dreams

3 ай бұрын

#languagelearning #languages #polyglot
Dive into the fascinating world of Slavic languages with Tim Keeley, a Professor of Cross-cultural Management and a polyglot with a passion for Slavic languages and cultures. In this comprehensive video.
Tim shares his 40-year experience studying Slavic languages, offering unique insights and effective strategies to learn and understand this diverse linguistic group.
Embark on a journey through the largest Indo-European ethno-linguistic group in Europe, exploring the intricacies of Slavic languages that range from 11 to 19, depending on classification criteria.
Tim introduces a methodical approach to grasp the essence of Slavic languages by focusing on just a few key languages, revealing how mastering even just three of them can provide a solid foundation for understanding the rest. He then reveals which other Slavic languages should be learned thereafter to gain the best understanding of all of the languages in the group.
0:41 My Slavic experience
1:34 Slavs background
2:18 How many Slavic languages are there?
2:07 3 groups of Slavic languages
3:38 The East Slavic languages
4:15 Russian
5:00 Ukrainian
7:46 Rusyn
7:56 Belarus
8:35 Demonstrate of East Slavic languages
9:53 The West Slavic languages
10:24 Polish
12:12 Kashubian
13:26 Silesian
14:07 Czech & Slovak
14:49 Czech
15:12 Croatian
15:39 Serbian
16:21 Sound demonstration
19:31 Slovene
20:46 BCMS
🌟 About Tim Keeley:
Tim Keeley, a seasoned professor and language enthusiast, brings four decades of experience living in Japan and mastering multiple Asian languages. His insights provide a roadmap for language learners eager to unlock the synergy among Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese.
👍 Like, Share, and Subscribe to Polyglot Dreams for More Language Insights!
🚀Website: polyglotdreams.com/
📧 email: timkeeley@polyglotdreams.com
💡More about me:
👉Academia: kyusan-u.academia.edu/TimDean..
👉 BBC : www.bbc.com/future/article/20..
👉Facebook: / tim.keeley

Пікірлер: 2 900
@joseamategarcia9276
@joseamategarcia9276 3 ай бұрын
I am a Spaniard and I could speak in Russian with a Serbian guy who was speaking in Serbian ..... but we both were a bit drunk.... in that situation one can speak any language.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Lol divertido
@meduzsazsa8490
@meduzsazsa8490 3 ай бұрын
So you understood russian and serbian? Whaat? 😂
@joseamategarcia9276
@joseamategarcia9276 3 ай бұрын
@@meduzsazsa8490 when the Soviet Union disappeared, many emigrants came to Spain, in my village there was a bar, the owner was Lithuanian and it was the place where people from the east used to go, the frank language there was Russian, the bar was placed close to my house, I used to go there to have a coffee or in the nights to have a beer or to have dinner, I found I love some dishes from Lithuania. A couple of years later I was able to speak Russian enough to have a casual bar conversion in Russian.
@FSKRadmin
@FSKRadmin 3 ай бұрын
Alcohol increases understandence many times! So I were speaking with a drunk Germanian for a long time using the only phrases: "I don't understand" and "Ich verstanden nicht". And we both were looking like two old chums if to see from the side 😅
@vitiachao9765
@vitiachao9765 2 ай бұрын
@@joseamategarcia9276 Jolín, ¡qué bueno! Молодец!
@geronimoqa
@geronimoqa 3 ай бұрын
“I met many polish people among the way and they were very surprised to hear that I’m a Japanese citizen” Also me, the viewer :0
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
宜しく
@DonHrvato
@DonHrvato Ай бұрын
​@@polyglotdreams😮😮😮
@BorisBoris-sl1sf
@BorisBoris-sl1sf Ай бұрын
Wherever I go, people ask me the same question: what was it like growing up Chinese? And I always answer, Growing up Chinese was very weird for me, because no one around me was Chinese, and neither was I.
@adamizbianski8347
@adamizbianski8347 3 ай бұрын
As a Polish speaker I learn russian and Ukrainian just by watching videos in these languages. It's enough for me because there is a sufficient similarity between Polish and these languages and I don't need textbooks or lists of words. I acquire both languages spontaneously, simply memorizing some words and phrases I hear. When it comes to everyday speech, at the moment I could understand almost all in Ukrainian and about 80% in russian. That means I could understand people inteviewied in streets and the news without much effort.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
That's a great and enjoyable way to learn.
@user-mu1pr5ng3b
@user-mu1pr5ng3b 3 ай бұрын
Я русский, понимаю почти всё по-украински. По-белорусски где-то 75%. По-польски, к сожалению, не больше 20%.
@Marcin-vn4kk
@Marcin-vn4kk 3 ай бұрын
​@@Maria_Nizhny_NovgorodI think the fact that we use different letters is the most challenging thing. All the rest is simply too similar.
@lordwiadro83
@lordwiadro83 3 ай бұрын
Me as a Polish speaker, I cannot even tell a difference between Ukrainian and Russian, they sound the same to me. So congratulations, you must be a language genius.
@gamermapper
@gamermapper 3 ай бұрын
@@Marcin-vn4kk and learning an alphabet is actually incredibly easy. In one week you can know all the letters. I don't get why this aspect is so overblown. I mean, I've learned the Japanese hiragana and katakana in 5 days. Even tho o don't understand anything in Japanese, at least I can read it. Slavic people who use the Latin alphabet can learn Cyrillic even easier, it's much less new characters than Japanese syllabery.
@gamermapper
@gamermapper 3 ай бұрын
As a Russian speaker which knows a little bit of Belarusian and Ukrainian actually Polish is really easy and I actually love Poles and their language
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Fantastic.. I am very pleased to know that.
@maxvalbircahang
@maxvalbircahang 3 ай бұрын
I am from Hungary. I am almost native in Bulgarian, my paternal ancestors were gardeners from Bulgaria. I studied in Russian school. I understand 95 % of Macedonian, 70 % of Belarussian, 60 % of Serbian-Croatian-Bosnian -Montenegrian and Ukranian, 50 % of Slovenian, 30 % of Czech and Slovak, 20 % of Polish. Understanding in writing is better, for example written Ukranian is easier for me than spoken, same with Polish.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Excellent... BTW... I love Hungarian
@teodorivanov4558
@teodorivanov4558 3 ай бұрын
Macedonian is just a Bulgarian dialect, so that's that.
@standardoilofnewjersey4260
@standardoilofnewjersey4260 3 ай бұрын
KOSOVO JE SRBIJA!
@maxvalbircahang
@maxvalbircahang 3 ай бұрын
@@standardoilofnewjersey4260 Albanian is not Slavic.
@maxvalbircahang
@maxvalbircahang 3 ай бұрын
@@teodorivanov4558 OK. This is a political question. You can make any dialect a language, and any languages into dialects.
@Ignisan_66
@Ignisan_66 3 ай бұрын
This is the first "Slavic languages" video I've seen where Slovak is talked about more than Czech, almost always its the other way around. We Slovaks often get overlooked, or confused for Slovenians.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Slovak is very special.
@ms-ht1cj
@ms-ht1cj 2 ай бұрын
Polish here. I love Slovak language. It sounds beautiful. I've learned it for one year, so I'm not fluent or anything, but I love it. ❤
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 2 ай бұрын
@@ms-ht1cj I am fond of Slovak too
@pawelbunio9524
@pawelbunio9524 2 ай бұрын
słowacki jest najbardziej bliski prasłowiańskiemu bardziej niż polski , polski miał wpływ kulturowy na białoruski i ukraiński dlatego dość duża ilość wspólnych słów . Jjak byłem w Słowenii to młodzi ludzie nie rozumieli jak mówiłem po chorwacku/serbsku ale jako Polak ich mowa była dla mnie podobna do słowackiej :) . Nie jestem znawcą ale to nie przypadek że Słowacja jest mylona z Słowenią , może były późniejsze migracje? Mieszkańcy okolic Krakowa w Polsce dawniej byli nazywani Chorwatami gdyż była wtórna migracja z Chorwacji .
@derkov
@derkov 2 ай бұрын
@@polyglotdreams Slovak it's just when Ukrainian tries speak czech.. :)
@marians7364
@marians7364 3 ай бұрын
I am Slovak and for me, these Polish nasal sounds are a nightmare. Even we are both West Slavic languages, but when we talk about the pronunciation, the Italian or Spanish are easier for me. On the other hand, we understand each other because many words are quite similar, but Polish pronunciation is so weird, other Slavic languages are OK.
@Kyojuruzi
@Kyojuruzi 3 ай бұрын
Ale co ty mówisz oprócz akcentu i tego że kilkana słów jest innych da się dogadac
@user-uu4kz8sr5i
@user-uu4kz8sr5i 3 ай бұрын
В каком роде "кошмар"? Что сложно произносить или звучит неприятно?
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Chápem, že poľská výslovnosť môže byť pre vás výzvou, ale pre mňa je to práve to, čo milujem na učení sa poľštiny. Západoslovanské jazyky majú svoje jemnosti, a aj keď sa môžu zdať náročné, práve v týchto rozdieloch nájdem zábavu a vzrušenie. Je fascinujúce vidieť, ako sa naše jazyky líšia a zároveň prelínajú, najmä v takých oblastiach ako fonetika a výslovnosť.
@marians7364
@marians7364 3 ай бұрын
@@user-uu4kz8sr5i Polish language is not phonetic. It is not normal and typical, that one letter you can pronounce in many ways. Such as: "ą", "ę", and you also use nasal sounds that are not normal (for most languages). When you have languages that use more sounds and pronunciations for one letter (Polish, English) it means that they are not sure how to write it and in past they just copied those words from another language, but didn't know how to deal with it.
@jansoltes971
@jansoltes971 3 ай бұрын
​@@KyojuruziJa też jestem Słowakiem i uważam, że on całkowicie przesadza. Słowa takie jak „koszmar” są zupełnie niestosowne.
@redhidinghood9337
@redhidinghood9337 3 ай бұрын
As someone from Bosnia I can confirm that Bosnian, Croatian, Montenegrin and Serbian are all just different official names/standards for the same language. They are a product of not just modern nationalism, but also historical divisions. Afterall, we don't have any single unifying name for the language, only the local country names. Interestingly, most of us just say "naš" (which means "our (language)") when we're referring to our language in everyday life, and especially when we're meeting someone from "our" countries in a foreign land like Germany where many of us emigrate to.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Thanks for pointing that out.
@ruralsquirrel5158
@ruralsquirrel5158 3 ай бұрын
Thank you for your honesty about this. Most people from ex-Yugoslavia are too nationalistic and get too irrational about this topic.
@z000ey
@z000ey 3 ай бұрын
@@ruralsquirrel5158 well, there is a problem that if people from ex-Yugoslavia agree that the language is the same, there are a great multitude of people from one particular nation that then openly say that language is their own and since it's the same throughout the language proves that all those different nations (both historically, culturally and religiously) are of their nation, thus all these lands are also of their nation, and call the others apostates of their nation... Were it not for that problem, it would be easier for the others to not be too nationalistic and irrational ;)
@gamermapper
@gamermapper 3 ай бұрын
Imagine if for some reason the was a conflict in Bosnia and Herzegovina and as a result Herzegovina will become independent. What will they call their language? Herzegovinian? Ahah 😂
@z000ey
@z000ey 3 ай бұрын
@@gamermapper we had a Monty Python type of comedians from Sarajevo (Top Lista Nadrealista - TLN) that did a sketch in the late '80's where they presented 6 mutually unintelligible languages, being: Serbian Croatian Bosnian Herzegovinian Montean (Gorski) Negrian (Crnski) and joked about having simultaneous translators for people to communicate :D kzbin.info/www/bejne/eqvXo4trmb2grrc
@rogiadzaiwg4992
@rogiadzaiwg4992 2 ай бұрын
step 1. be born in a slavic country
@yasho8927
@yasho8927 Ай бұрын
As a Bulgarian I understand 99% Russian but it’s difficult to speak, because of all the cases, I can’t remember which case to apply at which time. But is very easy to understand. The words are practically the same… BG „човек”, - Ru „человек”, БГ “хляб” - Ру “хлеб” Бг “небе” - Ру “небо”…
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams Ай бұрын
The cases are a big challenge.
@serged5689
@serged5689 17 күн бұрын
I am russian, learning bulgarian now, and I want to thank you for removing cases, otherwise it would be impossible 😅. Cases is something you learn with mother's milk. They are extremely hard to learn for adults even if you have them in your native language
@danish55812
@danish55812 3 ай бұрын
This is so unique, that you can do the whole review including all the Slavic languages. Salute! I really admire how knowledgeable and understanding you are in Linguistic. 🙏
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Thanks so much... it feels wonderful to be appreciated 👏
@undekagon2264
@undekagon2264 3 ай бұрын
I like this style of videos very much. I only had some russiant school and vistided Poland and Chechoslovakia (Tschechosslowakei) as a kid. But I always liked the sound of the languages. Maybe I go bavk to russian and the cyrillic script tonot lose everything completely
@OzkAltBldgCo-bv8tt
@OzkAltBldgCo-bv8tt 3 ай бұрын
​@@undekagon2264Radio Garden allows you to listen to any station in the world and save favorites list If you've not played Russian on Clozemaster now might be the time. Amazon Russian flash cards Word scrambles word searches crosswords
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
​@undekagon2264 all the best ... and thanks
@viktorarsovski1685
@viktorarsovski1685 2 ай бұрын
Man you're a legend :) I still think that the easiest language to learn for an alien (from ground up not knowing any) would be Macedonian No gramatical cases No pronunciation exceptions No "Slavonic" or silent letters (except maybe Dz and Dzh) 3 genders yes, but distinguished by a noun's last letter
@woytzekbron7635
@woytzekbron7635 3 ай бұрын
I got the next one for you - Mezduslovjanski, this is owesome artificial project, this language is understandable for every slavic speaker.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Yes... I agree, but few people speak so you can learn it to help you understand all the Slavic languages.
@user-wm8rj3jn3v
@user-wm8rj3jn3v 3 ай бұрын
In Ukraine we do have vocative - кличний відмінок as 7th case. I won't refer to someone by just друг, подруга, мама, тато, жрець etc., but will call by друже, подруго, мамо, тату, жерче. The vocative used to be delited by russian and replaced just by nominative. But after restoring the independence we restores the vocatice. ☺️
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Interesting... thanks
@frostflower5555
@frostflower5555 3 ай бұрын
Vocative is an amazing case-Serbian and Croatian have it. I think English has it when we call out to someone Oh Susan!
@user-wi4tn1yd6z
@user-wi4tn1yd6z 3 ай бұрын
💯. Наприклад: Петрові, Павлові
@eugenecrabs8622
@eugenecrabs8622 3 ай бұрын
​@@user-wi4tn1yd6z wrong example: what you listed is a dative case.
@user-wi4tn1yd6z
@user-wi4tn1yd6z 3 ай бұрын
@@eugenecrabs8622 yep.my mistake
@Kinotaurus
@Kinotaurus 3 ай бұрын
As a Slav, I could tell you within the first 10 seconds of this video what those 3 languages would be!
@censord6960
@censord6960 3 ай бұрын
The most popular) no more
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Excellent, I just spoke about this subject with two polish people today, and they guessed it would be Russian. After that, they thought maybe Polish, but they couldn't think of a third one.
@Kinotaurus
@Kinotaurus 3 ай бұрын
Clearly it had to be a south slavic language, and Serbo-Croatian has the most numbers and the most territory@@polyglotdreams
@RichieLarpa
@RichieLarpa 3 ай бұрын
I speak all of those 3 languages and I say personally that it is true, however with Bulgarian, I struggle. I would also struggle with Slovenian, but that is luckily not the case, as I speak Slovenian too.
@r.t.5767
@r.t.5767 2 ай бұрын
My first thought was that it would be Polish, Russian and Bulgarian. Serbo-Croatian as third would be my second thought.
@janmacicak1911
@janmacicak1911 2 ай бұрын
Slovak is also known as the Esperanto of Slavic languages as it is well understood by all Slavs
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 2 ай бұрын
For the most part, yes... but there is Interslavic.
@Cyclonut96
@Cyclonut96 2 ай бұрын
@@polyglotdreams ,... except that Slovak is a living, official language, the interslavic is an academic one, in a textbook.
@fiddlersgreen2433
@fiddlersgreen2433 Ай бұрын
not a surprise, Slovakia is right in the middle geographicaly
@zeljkopopovic2662
@zeljkopopovic2662 Ай бұрын
That is not up to Slovak to say, but up to other Slavic language speakers.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams Ай бұрын
Actually I know Russians and Poles whom I tested speaking Slovak and did not catch all that I said..
@user-tb2fj7dz2c
@user-tb2fj7dz2c 3 ай бұрын
I am a Polish native speaker who has been studying Russian dance childhood. I might say this: when I listen to Ukrainian or Belarussian I quite a lot from the conversation. The między knowledge of Polish and Russian helps a lot. I know both, the Cyrilic and Roman alphabets and this helps me with written Bułgaria n or Croatian 😊 Thanks to Cyrilic alphabet I can even read signs in Geek 😊
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
That's awesome... fun isn't it
@user-kg4fr9jr7v
@user-kg4fr9jr7v 2 ай бұрын
Интересно насколько сложно освоить русский поляку или наоборот. Насколько сложно вам было?
@funthomas-nh8ci
@funthomas-nh8ci 10 күн бұрын
никаких проблем. просто хватит слушать радио "говорит Москва" 5-6 лет ежедневно
@karczameczka
@karczameczka 3 ай бұрын
A curio: Slavic nasal vowels was common in proto-Slavic and round (“bulgarian”) glagolic script has got characters for them. Nowadays they only exist in polish.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
That's interesting... I didn't know that.
@andreitopala8502
@andreitopala8502 2 ай бұрын
The oldest forms of Cyrillic script have these characters as well.
@RositsaPetrovarjp7
@RositsaPetrovarjp7 2 ай бұрын
​Of course, you don't. You know ow nothing about Bulgarian as demonstrated in this video, except for Yugoslav proganda. This is not serious scholarship about Alavic languages. You know nothing about Glagolitc and Cyrillic. Your level is worse than Wikipedia ​@@polyglotdreams
@IvanRakilovsky
@IvanRakilovsky 2 ай бұрын
@@RositsaPetrovarjp7 He didn't say he knew anything about Bulgarian though, did he? But yeah, he spent more time talking about a minor Polish dialect, spoken by 100k people and then all he said about Bulgarian was that it does not have cases and that it's a good stepping stone if you want to learn Macedonian or something like that. I guess it's not really that offensive but it's strange. Especially if he is really interested in Slavic languages as a whole as he claims.
@IvanRakilovsky
@IvanRakilovsky 2 ай бұрын
@karczameczka The Glagolitic script was not exactly Bulgarian. It was created by the Byzantians Cyril and Methodius initially for a state called Great Moravia. It wasn't adopted in Moravia because of the Roman church opposing the influence from Constantinople. That's why Western Slavic countries use the Latin alphabet. The actual alphabet created in Bulgaria was the one that followed the Glagolitic and yes, it's the Cyrilic alphabet.
@zekralftzen4472
@zekralftzen4472 3 ай бұрын
I came back 2 weeks ago from Poland, I loved it, though I learned some words before heading there, I wanted to see which slavic language is worth it and I won't lie: I will keep learning Polish, the difficulty is what makes it fun in my opinion, thanks for explaining the slavic languages, greetings from México :)
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
All the best to you on your new journey into Slavic languages
@Manueltion15
@Manueltion15 3 ай бұрын
@@polyglotdreamshow much languages do you know fluently(to have a complex conversation)
@awbinn3377
@awbinn3377 2 ай бұрын
Muy bien, amigo. Yo soy polaco y aprendo tu idioma. Aunque no siempre es fácil- me encanta. Que disfrutes también tu aventura con mi lengua. Saludos desde Polonia 🇵🇱
@fire8209
@fire8209 3 ай бұрын
Thank you very much. I'm Bulgarian and have learned Russian at school (it was compulsory back then). I have wondered what other Slavic language it would be useful to know and thanks to your video I have chosen Polish 😊 I admire how brave you are to jump in this quite political and sensitive topic.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
I am very pleased to know that ... thank you so much for sharing.
@krzycho751
@krzycho751 3 ай бұрын
Thank you for choosing Polish 😀 In Poland we were forced to learn Russian at schools too. It's never a good thing to be forced to do something even if it's something as important as foreign language. Luckily I still remember most of Cyrillic alphabet 😀
@XTheOneCat
@XTheOneCat 3 ай бұрын
and you picked the Hardest to learn from the entire globe xZ
@fire8209
@fire8209 3 ай бұрын
A Wednesday child 😅
@gamermapper
@gamermapper 2 ай бұрын
And today people are forced to learn English.
@0VELVETVOICE0
@0VELVETVOICE0 3 ай бұрын
I really love this kind of content. I enjoyed every minute. I lern polish and felt in love with Slavic languages. Would love the see more like this, cause I am absolutely interested in language science.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Thank you so much. More is yet to come. Did you watch the video about the East Asian cultural sphere concerning Chinese, Vietnamese, Japanese, and Korean?
@Kajkes
@Kajkes 3 ай бұрын
As a Polish person raised in Silesia close to the Czech border, who apart from French, German and English in school learned by himself a bit of Russian and Ukrainian, who lives for 10 years in Bulgaria and speaks the language, I can say that I understand most of any written text in every Slavic language, but Slovenian :D It's somehow so different than the rest, sounds a bit like Czech with some balkan vocabulary. My suggestion of top 3? Russian, Serbocroatian, Slovak - because it's easier to learn than Polish, and Polish can be a fourth one. With these Bulgarian will be easy to learn, unless you didn't learn English before, because the gramar is more similar to it than to the rest of Slavic languages.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
I have to disagree because Polish is such a beautiful language ☺️
@times4937
@times4937 3 ай бұрын
In my opinion, the Slovenian language sounds very similar to Latvian, of course not in the lexical sense, but in the way it sounds
@jernejahcin1960
@jernejahcin1960 2 ай бұрын
Im am slovenian. We have like 5 strong dialects within our language in such a small country
@Cyclonut96
@Cyclonut96 2 ай бұрын
@@polyglotdreams Sorry, as a Slovak, I would agree with @Kajkes in this one. Polish uses extra awkward unnecessary letters somewhat similar to French, which distract from hearing the words or the message. They are harder to understand down south than the Slovaks are. Also, there are many Slovak villages spread out in Serbia, Croatia and Slovenia from 200-300 years and locals understand each other better, but there are no Polish villages there that I know. I also agree with some commenters that Slovenia is more different from other Slavic languages, having visited Ljubljana myself, and could not understand much.
@MNUrkuri
@MNUrkuri 3 ай бұрын
Polish may have more native speakers, but Slovak is truly a central and kind of more neutral basis for Western Slavic languages. Is also an inroad to Serbian, Croatian, etc. Of all, Slovak gives the learner a basis to break into nearly all Slavic languages.
@zlatolek5626
@zlatolek5626 3 ай бұрын
Pravda!!!
@jankowal8871
@jankowal8871 3 ай бұрын
Jako Polak mogę się tylko z tobą zgodzić . Sądzę że Rosjanin szybciej zrozumie Słowaka niż Polaka.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
I made a similar that comment about Slovak, but still Polish has many more speakers and helps you also with Kashubian, Silesian and Sorbian.
@1langueen100jours
@1langueen100jours 3 ай бұрын
I had exactly this intuition: that speak one of the three languages of each sub-group, you could perfectly communicate with every Slavic-speaking folks (at least, have simple conversations). Myself, speaking ok Russian and rather broken Serbian/Montenegrin, I could already grasp some words in Polish conversations or newspaper and I could communicate with Bulgarians when I was in Sofia last summer. This video encouraged me to start Polish. It's kinda far on my lanuages waiting list so I'll have to be patient... But I'll do it for sure one day! Hvala puno/spassiba/merci!
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Awesome... that is what I hope for... Slaves appreciating all the variations.
@ZalupaTv
@ZalupaTv 2 ай бұрын
Polish is a bunch of amaziness! Totally cute and adorable language full of surprises. If you're a native slav speaker, you'll sooner or later come to the point where you start understanding your own language the way better than before only by learining Polish.
@pawelbunio9524
@pawelbunio9524 2 ай бұрын
dziękuje, Ďakujem, Děkuji, Дякую
@Dolph681
@Dolph681 2 ай бұрын
@@polyglotdreams By the way Slavs and Slavic is political term invented by Katerina the Great for russian empire expansion 250 years ago, just so you know.
@SaturnineXTS
@SaturnineXTS 3 ай бұрын
Hey dude, you sound like the perfect target audience for Interslavic. It's a constructed, semi-naturalistic language meant to be intelligible to any Slavic speaker and contains features and vocabulary from West, East and South Slavic branches, as well as being etymologically conservative and phonologically "middle-ground" when it comes to the living Slavic languages. As for the BCMS language - that's one funny situation. Politically they're considered the same language, but in reality it's the Shtokavian, Chakavian and Kajkavian dialects that are different from each other - much more so than those national "languages", all of which are based on Shtokavian. For that reason I just use the term "shtokavian language" when I talk about BCMS.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Yes... Interslavic is quite easy to understand for most Slavic speakers. Spot on about BCMS.
@Pidalin
@Pidalin 3 ай бұрын
English is better understandable for me as Czech than some interslavic. Problem with interslavic is that you still need at least some experiences with other slavic languages, for example it uses DA for yes and you just have to know it's yes in other slavic languages, there are many similar examples. I can kind of understand it, but it's very uncomfortable to read it and sometimes it needs some time to get it. The best interslavic in these days is just English. 😀
@SaturnineXTS
@SaturnineXTS 3 ай бұрын
@@Pidalin That's because you have studied English. Imagine understanding English in like 85% without ever having to learn it
@Pidalin
@Pidalin 3 ай бұрын
@@SaturnineXTS Ok, but you are growing up surrounded by English, kids born after like 2010 already speak English maybe even better than their native langauges. I am not saying it's literally a good thing for your culture, but it will make communication in the future definitely easier.
@z000ey
@z000ey 3 ай бұрын
True. Croatian 3 different dialects are more different that one of the dialects (shtokavian) from the rest of BSM. The shtokavian became the main dialect during the 19th century when it got codified as the main language, and one of the reasons then was purely political, in order to get a southern interslavic language as it was different also from Serbian at the time.
@AndyJugglesLanguages
@AndyJugglesLanguages 3 ай бұрын
Hello Tim, I really enjoyed searching this video. I started with Russian many years ago but didn't get to a very high level. Since then, I studied Croatian and then studied Polish. I found Polish and Russian the most useful for me as I worked in a shop where there were lots of Polish and Lithuanian people. Polish is my best Slavic language because of my exposure to it. I then went on to learn some Ukrainian in 2022. I found it relatively easy because of my Polish and Russian. Now, I just started learning Czech as I'm going to the Polyglot Gathering in Prague in May Hope to see you there. Thanks for the great video. and for your passion for languages.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Great... thanks I will see you there
@Raznosac
@Raznosac 3 ай бұрын
Also, there is no such thing as "Bosnian". The ethnicity that changed its name from Muslim (in terms to ethnicity) to Bosniak, (old term for someone from geographical region of Bosnia), so they should call it Bosniak, not Bosnian, and also this artificial term is rejected by the majority of population in Bosnia-Herzegovina, the Christians, but this fake term is constantly repeated by westerners as if it was something real. As for what is called Serbo-Croatian in linguistics, its origins are clear to everyone that knows a bit of real history. Serbo-Croatian is a literary Serbian language made and standardised as literary language by Serbian linguist Vuk Karadžić, shtokavian dialect of Herzegovina and most of Serbia, and this standard Serbian language was adopted by some Austri-Hungarian citizens (Croatian original language and literary standard is chakavian, not shtokavian) as their own, which would soon become a source for many linguistic and ethnic machinations by Austria-Hungary, creating an issue between Croats and Serbs that never existed before. To see the term BCSM is really sickening, it just shows how the west is using false regional differences to divide us and make us look different, the false differences they themselves created and keep promoting.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Thanks for your detailed input... it is controversial, and others may also offer well developed arguments. It is best leave the emotions out.
@ulovil
@ulovil 3 ай бұрын
The thing that you are a Japanese citizen is really the most surprising
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Yes
@Slonceism
@Slonceism 2 ай бұрын
I’m a native speaker of Polish and I have to say that the easiest way to understand other Slavic languages is to learn a very interesting artificial language called Interslavic - at least for native Slavs, not sure if it would work with non-Slavic speakers. I’m not very good at understanding other Slavic languages or even the varieties native to Poland such as Kaszubian or Silesian but experiencing the Interslavic speech was a mind-blowing experience. Picture this: I’m on holidays in Croatia and some dude comes up to me and wants to sell me a cruise or something. I’m not interested so I tell him to leave me (in English because I find it easier lol). Instead of leaving me be this guy asks me where do I come from, and immediately starts speaking a weird mixture of Russian, Croatian, Polish, probably Czech and I don’t know what else! And I understood 99% of what he said! I was able to understand all the details about the cruise, prices, discounts, places it visits, time schedule, the boarding point, whether lunch was included, what else was provided- without actually knowing most of the languages this Interslavic speech was based on. Needless to say I was so amazed by this experience that I bought what he was selling just to thank him for the opportunity to learn about this interlinguistic project :D I think we Slavs should get to know that Interslavic thing, it helps a lot with communication:)
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 2 ай бұрын
Yes... Interslavic is very easy to understand... quite amazing 👏
@nakigoto4345
@nakigoto4345 3 ай бұрын
That's a wonderful overview! I'm Polish. I agree with the top3 recommendations no doubt. Then I think Bulgarian and Czech seem equally worthy of the 4th spot (or you can alternate with Macedonian and Slovak respectively) as they give better coverage than Slovene, which mainly only applies to Slovenia and is the most "lonely" member of the Slavic family. But those are minor nit-picks of mine :D I know it's a somewhat different topic but I can't help but mention PJM (Polish Sign Language) which is a native language of the Deaf community in Poland. It has many similarities to sign languages in our neighboring countries. A user of PJM once explained to me how Ukrainian and Russian sign languages are different but share the same root so it's possible for the users to communicate some basic information(a fully-fledged conversation is much more difficult though). I find it really interesting how you don't actually need words to see the Slavic connection, our shared culture and tradition :)
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
The order if the additional ones is quite debatable as you point out. Thanks so much for the insights about sign language.
@3iknet327
@3iknet327 Ай бұрын
Your passion really convinced me to watch this video until the end and it has inspired me to continue learning Polish!
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams Ай бұрын
Fantastic thanks for telling me
@konstantinfromkrasnoyarsk5941
@konstantinfromkrasnoyarsk5941 3 ай бұрын
In general, the Russian language is more connected with the languages ​​of the South Slavs, since the Church Slavonic language came from them and we have many words with two spellings, for example the word Град And Город
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
That is an interesting proposition.
@eugenecrabs8622
@eugenecrabs8622 3 ай бұрын
Correct. Russian evolved as mainly a written imperial language, which had one of its principal origins in the religious texts written in Churchslavonic (which in turn had its origin in old Bulgarian/Macedonian). This is why any Russian who was never exposed to Bulgarian language, will understand some 95-99% if given a Bulgarian book to read, but much less than 50% if listened to spoken Bulgarian. Try it out, it's an interesting and funny exercise.
@DimaDobry888
@DimaDobry888 2 ай бұрын
​@@eugenecrabs8622я как русский человек , могу подтвердить , если македонец , что то напишет , я это пойму , довольно легко 🙂
@amnbvcxz8650
@amnbvcxz8650 Ай бұрын
@@eugenecrabs8622not true. As a russian speaker i have to learn bulgarian to understand it, and it has different grammar more similar to english in some aspects. Most words share common roots, so you can guess the meaning in a lot of words but still nowhere enough to understand 95%. Also, many words have simialr sounds but different meaning. I found other slavic languages more similar in terms of grammar for sure
@eugenecrabs8622
@eugenecrabs8622 Ай бұрын
@@amnbvcxz8650 don't tell me that you cannot read a Bulgarian book without understanding 95% of it.
@whiskeysk
@whiskeysk 2 ай бұрын
Very nice overview. Just a minor note - native Slovak speaker would say "Čítal som knihu/čítala som knihu" with a slightly different word order and omitting the personal pronoun as the person is immediately obvious from the verb suffix. "Ja som čítal/čítala knihu" has a slightly different meaning putting an extra emphasis on the person rather than just declaring someone has read a book.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 2 ай бұрын
Yes, thank you.
@sandravidakovic5408
@sandravidakovic5408 2 ай бұрын
The same is the case in BCMS
@andriinemchenko2550
@andriinemchenko2550 3 ай бұрын
Ukrainian has a vocative case, although it's not often used in practice today.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Yes... thanks
@MarcLeonbacher-lb2oe
@MarcLeonbacher-lb2oe 2 ай бұрын
Not often used? Is the vocative replaced?
@daftduck7385
@daftduck7385 2 ай бұрын
​@@MarcLeonbacher-lb2oenah it's not
@dymytryruban4324
@dymytryruban4324 Ай бұрын
Slovak doesn't have vocative case any more.
@JorgeGarcia-lw7vc
@JorgeGarcia-lw7vc 3 ай бұрын
Totally agree with this video!! I've learned quite a bit of Serbo-Croat, CZ and Russian. Just some extra points from my side. On cases: Slovak and Slovene, I believe do not have Vocative. When it comes to BCSM, Kajkavian and Cajkavian are out of that standard, and are probably better classified as separate languages from BCSM. You will hear some Kajkavian and Cajkavian influence in local Croatian speech in many areas, kinda like you'll hear Bavarian hints or Koelsch hints in local Standard German. For language learning, I would take Slovak over PL, just because Slovak is easier, and nicer to hear, it would be good enough to understand PL, UKR, and even, with BCSM, Slovenian. CZ is tougher than SK. I was able to communicate with Bulgarians and Macedonians, just using Serbian, with Upper Sorbians, Slovaks and Poles, using CZ. A knowledge of RUS with some CZ/SK goes a long way to catch most of Ukrainian and Rusyn. Polish only really comes in handy enough in case you need to communicate in Belarus to back up the Russian. I just don't like the sound of Polish or it's writing, but hey, personal preferences, hehe. Unfortunately, Sorbian is dying, with probably only less than 50,000 speakers left. Although I speake German fluently, I would make it a point to speak CZ with Sorbian speakers so they could show its use to outside speakers! WOnderful video!!
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Thanks so much for your interesting input.
@JorgeGarcia-lw7vc
@JorgeGarcia-lw7vc 3 ай бұрын
Often, when selecting a language, the language selects you. Ex, if you have a Serbian partner, or a Polish girlfriend, get relocated to Bosnia--you take that as a start, and it will end up useful way beyond that.@@polyglotdreams
@zagrizena
@zagrizena 3 ай бұрын
Positive on lack of vocative in Slovene. It might have existed historically and might show up in random isolated phrases, but generally it's neither taught neither used. I'm not sure about all dialects, though. As a Slovene I find it interesting, that aside from Kajkavian, which is really closely related to Slovene, I can understand Čakavian much better than Štokavian or Serbian, especially, once one gets used to various Slovene dialects. Although even Serbian is not that hard to understand with intermittent exposure - our generation (post YU) were still able to study from exclusively Serbian and English textbooks in uni in one class.
@Carantania
@Carantania 3 ай бұрын
Mistake: Ukrainian has 7 cases and Slovenian 6 (vocative)
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Thanks... I stand corrrected Клѝчний відмίнок
@Kinotaurus
@Kinotaurus 3 ай бұрын
You could even argue that there are vestiges of vocative in Russian, too (see a video by Микитко Сын Алексеев).@@polyglotdreams
@aleskosir2727
@aleskosir2727 3 ай бұрын
Thank you for a nice introduction to slavic languages. Lepo delo. Pozdrav iz Slovenije
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Thank you for your comment. I just 💯 absolutely love Slovenia 🇸🇮
@user-id6ig3ld1t
@user-id6ig3ld1t 3 ай бұрын
Who do you think has easier starter point to become a polyglot like. 1. Who knows English 2. Who knows Slavic language 3. Who knows Latin family language
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
For total number of languages - who knows Slavic languages.
@RogerRamos1993
@RogerRamos1993 3 ай бұрын
As a Brazilian Portuguese native speaker, Spanish and Italian are the easiest languages to learn, then French. Catalan is not hard, but it takes effort to look up for content. For example, Catalan or Valencian youtube is very weak in terms of creators and viewers. There are few good resources to learn Neapolitan or Sicilian, and those are spoken and sung languages. They are not published, not used in movies and series(with a few recent exceptions), and not used in education. I am more of a polyreader than a polyglot. I have read several books in French and in Italian, as well as a few in Spanish, a couple of books in Catalán and a theater piece in Neapolitan. If you know Spanish or Portuguese, Italian, and French or Catalán, you'll understand to a good degree almost any little spoken Romance language, specially in its written form. There's the one exception though, which is Romanian. To understand Romanian, study Romanian, and that's what I've been doing lately. The good thing about Romanian is that it can be a good introduction to Slavic languages, in the sense that it contains hundreds of words of Slavic origin.
@MLiv-bn4cl
@MLiv-bn4cl 3 ай бұрын
As a religious Jew who was raised in Ukraine, I speak Russian at home, I picked Ukrainian in the streets, I learned Hebrew, Aramaic (the language of the Talmud) and Yiddish in school and currently I’m writing a comment in English 😂. Because of this languages I’m able to understand written Polish, and quite well to understand Belarusian. When I was in Germany I realised that I can understand almost half of the written words, and people around me understood me quite well when I spoke to them in Yiddish, though when they spoke to me I couldn’t understand a word 😂. Also Hebrew and Aramaic are letting me to learn Arabic on duolingo easier, because they are all Semitic languages.
@RogerRamos1993
@RogerRamos1993 3 ай бұрын
@@MLiv-bn4cl In the future, learning German will be a breeze for you, then Dutch, then Afrikaans...If you study Polish, then you get Czech almost for free and so on. If you were to study Romance languages, I'd suggest you French and Spanish.
@gee8883
@gee8883 3 ай бұрын
​​​​​@@MLiv-bn4clBuharim jews speak uzbek ( Turkics) , Tajik( iranic) Russian ( slavic) and Hebrew/ Arabic ( for religious teaching ) and Chinese ( Tungan) for business , recently many learning English. Central asians jews grew up learning totally unrelated languages and somehow managed to sound native in many.
@zurugar1530
@zurugar1530 2 ай бұрын
Fantastic presentation. I missed one small detail: our languages reveal that most Slavs feel some sort of unity with Slavs from other countries, especially contrary to non Slavs. Correct if I am wrong. The term Slavs or the names of countries like Slovakia or Slovenia, derives from the word 'slovo' which means 'word'. So we are the people who recognise words and share the same/similar language. On the other hands, we have 'dumb'/'speechless' neighbours who don't know 'words. In Polish dumb is 'niemy', hence are western neighbours are 'Niemcy' (Germans).
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 2 ай бұрын
Exactly 💯
@user-fc5yu3oo3e
@user-fc5yu3oo3e 3 ай бұрын
Happy to see that your channel is boosting so fast!
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Me too! Thanks so much for the support!
@markothy8
@markothy8 3 ай бұрын
This video's basis is exactly the question I've been pondering for a couple of years! As a sidenote, my first language was Polish. I can understand written Croatian relatively well, and one time I extensively used Croatian sources for a university paper! Prior to that, I had had zero previous exposure to it. Fun anecdote. :)
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Thank you so much for sharing that with me.
@Max-UA
@Max-UA 3 ай бұрын
Also, the map of languages spoken in Ukraine looks rather provocative than scientific. Not a single time in 10 years I heard a person speaking Polish natively in my region although I’ve been travelling a lot and I speak Polish as a foreign language. Ukrainian-speaking area spans much further to the west onto the territory of modern Poland (at least it used to be there before the WW1 and WW2 when a lot of population was forced to move in both directions of the border).
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
I think it's difficult to say how many Polish speakers remain in that area
@Marcin-vn4kk
@Marcin-vn4kk 3 ай бұрын
Every Belarusian that I meet in Poland say that nobody speaks Belarusian in Belarus.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Sad...
@xxxyyy8779
@xxxyyy8779 3 ай бұрын
People don't speak Ukrainian in most parts of the Ukraine too despite discriminatory practices of the regime against the Russian language. It's a bit like Irish in Ireland: people claim to know it, to love it even but with the exception of few symbolic phrases normally prefer to communicate in English.
@user-pj8ji5df5k
@user-pj8ji5df5k 3 ай бұрын
​@@xxxyyy8779what regime? I live in Ukraine (Dnipro, more like the eastern part) and you are talking nonsense. I hear Ukrainian everywhere. We all know it.
@sergiygryadushkin3056
@sergiygryadushkin3056 28 күн бұрын
@@xxxyyy8779 what you are saying is nonsense. not sure you have ever been to Ukraine at all.
@koroborro
@koroborro 27 күн бұрын
@@xxxyyy8779 totally wrong. people in Ukraine speaks ukrainian, like 75% ukrainian language everywhere in Ukraine. 98% Western Ukraine, 70% Eastern Ukraine.
@nquig3
@nquig3 3 ай бұрын
Fantastic video. This is the most in-depth and clear video I’ve seen on this. Thank you!
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Glad you enjoyed it! Thanks so much for the appreciation ☺️
@nataliya6093
@nataliya6093 3 ай бұрын
this video is full of anti-scientific lies, check the information🫤
@LVRugger
@LVRugger 3 ай бұрын
Around 20 years ago I took Ukrainian as my language in college. I was the only non-Russian major in the class. The Russian majors took Ukrainian as it has more cases and learning Ukrainian grammar made them better in their Russian. I barely remember anything, but I keep thinking to add it to my learning time.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Go for it!
@carli2302
@carli2302 2 ай бұрын
I’am a native macedonian speaker. I can understand 100 percent of serbo-croatian or bulgarian, and can speak the languages relatively good, which is not that surprising. What surprised me the most is how much I can understand russian (around 60 percent and that number rises if they talk slower) although I have never studied the language, nor I have been exposed to russian media, culture etc. I understand russian much better than slovene, even though macedonian and slovenian are in the same south slavic group, which makes no sense to me. Someone mentioned that it could be explained by the old church slavonic language… When it comes to the south slavic languages, it’s worth mentioning the Torlakian (shopski) dialect, which is a transitional form between serbo-croatian on one hand and macedonian-bulgarian on the other. It’s spoken mainly in south serbia, northeastern part of macedonia and northwest bulgaria. The relationship between the macedonian and bulgarian language is hot topic. I can say that they share very similar grammar and the difference is largely lexical and idiomatic. From my experience, I think that the bulgarian language is heavily influenced by the russian lexicon, and that is not surprising considering that they were part of the Eastern block for 50 years. Conversely, the macedonian language, as part of non-aligned and pro-west oriented Yugoslavia, has adopted a lot of German, French and English words. And for me, as a south slavic speaker, the toughest language, definitely is polish. I can’t understand almost anything, with the exception of the word K…A, but surprisingly the slovak language is much more intelligible to my south slavic ear
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 2 ай бұрын
Thanks... those are very interesting observations!
@valentinbitsinandmaxx8389
@valentinbitsinandmaxx8389 2 ай бұрын
@@polyglotdreams As a Bulgarian native speaker from the South-Western part of Bulgaria I can confirm 100% what carli2302 wrote. I can understand 100% of the language(s) spoken on either side of Bulgarian-Macedonian border plus I understand about 85-90% of BCMS although I have never studied it. I've also noticed that speakers of BCMS have hard time understanding Bulgarian( unlike Bulgarians most of whom are able to understand BCMS ) which make me think that you are wrong about suggesting Learning BCMS as the language of South Slavic group in order to be able to understand all Slavic languages. I've learnt Russian for a short period of time as well. Not long enough to be able to learn to speak it grammatically correct ( I have absolutely no knowledge of how to use the cases properly ) but somehow I am able to communicate with Russian speakers without any problems. I've noticed that I can understand Belorussian quite well and I am able to understand about 65-70% of Ukrainian probably because of my very limited exposure to Slovak as well.( I used to work with some Slovaks about 20 years ago) . I can't speak any Slovak but I am somehow able to understand it both in oral and written form. Unlike Slovenian 🙂 which I can only understand in written form. The way vowel accents are used in Slovenian is so uncharacteristic for my years that my brain just shuts off. I am also able to understand to some extend both Polish and Czech but only in their written form. My brain is not willing to suffer the efforts of trying to understand sounds that come out of Polish speakers.
@gecattaa
@gecattaa 2 ай бұрын
let me clarify for you - old church Slavonic language == old Bulgarian language. The modern Russian is based on it. So the influence is in different direction :)
@mockingbirdex3450
@mockingbirdex3450 3 ай бұрын
Great video! It manages to be succinct and informative.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Thanks so much!!!
@ruralsquirrel5158
@ruralsquirrel5158 3 ай бұрын
I learned Russian and Czech, and found that while they help me understand some Polish, it is still hard to follow. Surprisingly, Czech helped me understand a lot of Slovene (besides Slovak, obviously). As you said, the South Slavic languages are otherwise a big blank for me, and I always wondered which to learn. You and me being around the same age, I like the idea of Serbo-Croatian from the old-timer textbooks we grew up with. You've convinced me that should be the best choice. Great video!
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Thank you so much for sharing your experiences. I have read that Slovak and Slovene have the same origin.
@WPope
@WPope 3 ай бұрын
It makes sense that Czech helps you understand Slovene if you look at history. Apparently Slovene has gone through the least changes in the last few centuries and before the hungarians settled where thery currently liver the Czech and Slovene lands were connected by slavic speakers
@zagrizena
@zagrizena 3 ай бұрын
Slovene has a lot more shared history with czechoslovakian language than with most of other south Slavic language until fairly recently. It is fairly fragmented in terms of number of dialects, to the point where several are hardly mutually intelligible, when spoken in a really archaic/traditional way, presumably because of our geography and varied neighbouring influences through the centuries. Considering that the first slovene-speaking country (carantania) encompassed a big part of modern day Austria and even some Hungary, historical Czech-Slovak-Slovene dialect continuum is pretty understandable.
@letecmig
@letecmig 2 ай бұрын
Its about 'practice' and exposure - if you learn Czech&Russian as non-native speaker, then if you are exposed to Polish only ocasionally, obviously you would understand little. .... ....But it would be very different after a month just watching Polish TV one or two hours a day.... after a while you would start to decode 'similar but different' stuff you and that allows you to decode spoken language/sentences as a whole (speaking is something completely different of course). I have similar experience with Ukrainian ...as a native speaker of Czech, I learned Russian ..... and after the start of the war I started to watch stuff in Ukrainian on youtube ...... at first i did understand little, but after few hours of listening to UA, many things started to 'click' (these patterns of 'similar but different' compared to either to russian or czech) and I now basically understand everything in Ukrainian when I watch a video
@dymytryruban4324
@dymytryruban4324 Ай бұрын
After studying Czech and Polish, I realized that these languages have a lot of false friends. Mám jístotu že nevíš co znamená "pevnost". A classical example is "Szukam dzieci w sklepie." Gramatically they are quite similar though.
@Max-UA
@Max-UA 3 ай бұрын
7:19 One thing to note is that the country name is Belarus and the language name is Belarusian (with one s) but not “Bela-russian”. This is important because otherwise it sounds as another version of russian, which is not the case. From historical perspective and language genesis, Belarusian is a successor of Rusian [roosian] (called after the medieval state of Rus’) just as Ukrainian. I’m sure that author knows all of these facts. And many thanks for explaining the history of Ukrainian language for the English-speaking audience.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Yes... thanks. I know it was a typo
@michaelyaroslavtsev2444
@michaelyaroslavtsev2444 3 ай бұрын
No, you don't need to take it too seriously. This distinction is by and large a forced nationalistic shibboleth. Don't waste your time on these and thanks for the terrific video!
@neotek8582
@neotek8582 3 ай бұрын
It’s Belaroosian, not Belarusian. Old Russian and old Ukrainian were much more similar centuries ago. Ukrainian was morphed due to the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth domination. Hence why it’s slightly more similar to Polish than Russian. Russian also morphed due to the adoption of German, French and English.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Yes, that was a type of by the editor. Thanks for your input.
@nik205
@nik205 2 ай бұрын
Армянин что ли? Первый раз такую армянскую фамилию слышу - Беларусян. Змагары на все пойдут лишь бы отечество подешевле продать.
@alexbrown2401
@alexbrown2401 Ай бұрын
what old ukrainian? Nobody heard about Ukraine or the ukrainian language 150 years ago.
@sergiygryadushkin3056
@sergiygryadushkin3056 28 күн бұрын
@@alexbrown2401 have you ever tried to read books? maybe you will learn something new...
@koroborro
@koroborro 27 күн бұрын
@@alexbrown2401 боже, яке кончене)
@niktonin7208
@niktonin7208 3 ай бұрын
I'm from Belarus, I speak Belarusian and Russian. We have both these as the state languages. Unfortunately, I rarely see anybody speaking Belarusian... Also I can understand Ukrainian because I have watched LOTS of Ukrainian TV shows and have Ukrainian pals. And now I'm studying at the Polish university.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Yes, it is very unfortunate.
@user-kh6lb4xf6v
@user-kh6lb4xf6v 3 ай бұрын
Thank you for mentioning Rusyn! And yes 26:18 - it indeed can help, as for Slovak and Rusyn is is even closer than Rusyn and Ukrainian (based on the number of speakers). It's because as you can see on the map at 7:47 most Rusyn speakers live in Slovakia and except of the state language (Slovak) speak the Prešov Rusyn variant, which is very different from the one spoken in Zakarpattyan Ukraine and even sometimes hard to understand, yet Prešov Rusyn is extremely close to the Lemko Rusyn that is a codified langauge in Poland and thus spoken by Polish Rusyns and lastly - Pannonian Rusyn spoken in Serbia was codified based on a Sotak eastern SLOVAK dialect). Ironically, people oftentimes just focus on Zakarpattyan Rusyn when mentioning Rusyn, yet except of not having a proper codification (because of the Ukrainian government not officially recognising Rusyns and Rusyn language as separate) it doesn't even have that big of an amount of speakers, compared to Prešov, Lemko or Pannonian variants - all of which have proper codifications and grammatical rules and syntactically differ quite lot from Ukrainian and even from the eastern Slavic language group. That being said, saying that 90% of Rusyn is similar to Ukrainian checks out maybe only for the Zakarpattyan variant/(dialect continuum?), which is not the best sample when talking about Rusyns. If you want to compare proper standardised variants of Rusyn, I recommend the lem.fm radio, which contains Prešov, Lemko and sometimes even Pannonian variants. And I really hope our fellow Zakarpattyan Carpatho-Rusyn brothers will be able to codify their variant very soon!
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
That information is so fascinating 👏 thank you.
@nataliya6093
@nataliya6093 3 ай бұрын
the so-called East Slavic languages are anti-scientific and outdated nonsense, linguists talk about Central Slavic and peripheral Slavic languages.
@user-gw6mm3hh2y
@user-gw6mm3hh2y 2 ай бұрын
Русинська один з діалектів української
@user-kh6lb4xf6v
@user-kh6lb4xf6v 2 ай бұрын
​@@user-gw6mm3hh2y in that case Ukrainian is a dialect of Polish...or Russian...:) you can clearly see what harm national opression - saying that Ukrainian language is a dialect of XY and that Ukrainians are just a subethnos of XY - did to Ukrainian people, so stop being stuck up in past and respect others if you yourself want to be respected. All of the countries (Poland, Slovakia, USA, Canada, Hungary, Serbia...) where Carpatho-Rusyns live as a minority recognise Carpatho-Rusyn as a separate national identity and language...Ukraine is the ONLY exception. In addition, Carpatho-Rusyn language is protected by the European charter of minority languages...so I guess go whine to them that they are protecting a "dialect" and right after that proceed to complain about how Russians and Poles considered Ukrainian just as a dialect of their language...the hypocrisy is so strong :)
@slotos
@slotos 2 ай бұрын
Language distinction is inherently tied to a political process. Ukrainian Rusyns are predominantly content to be a part of Ukrainian nation and for them the distinction is not critical, as long as they can talk and create using the language as they learned it since childhood. A Ukrainian coming to Slovakia and claiming that Rusyn is a dialect of Ukrainian would be a tone deaf stupidity, because there’s a clear political will for recognition there. And frankly, Ukrainian Rusyn variants could easily influence standard Ukrainian development, with the current drive to ditch Russian influences. Splitting is not the only fate for languages, after all. PS: There was a Russian funded campaign to attempt to rile up a “DNR” situation in transcarpathia around Rusyn language. It failed, but left an imperial aftertaste. As a result, Ukrainians without a taste for linguistic nuances can react to attempts to distinguish Rusyn and Ukrainian… aggressively.
@wg611
@wg611 3 ай бұрын
Although I don’t speak any Slavic language, as someone who’s interested in etymology, philology, culture, etc. I have a strong feeling that Ukrainian, and Belarusian are closer to Polish (West Slavic) than Russian (East Slavic) despite those (Belarusian and Ukrainain) are written in Cyrillic and culturally they are orthodox unlike the Polish are catholic. Therefore, categorically they can be in between or cross-categorized.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
You could make that argument, but normally their classified as East Slavic languages.
@DANKARPENKO
@DANKARPENKO 3 ай бұрын
I speak both in Ukrainian and Russian. I think Ukrainian is closer to Polish more than to russian. Russian is similar to Bulgarian. The core of Russian is in church - Slavonic language that no longer exist but were made by Bulgarian/Macedonian priests to spread christianity.
@love_for_travel
@love_for_travel 2 ай бұрын
I am Ukranian, and I confirm, your feeling are true. I was surprised when I heard Belarusian for a first time I understood everything - most of the lexicon is the same as Ukrainian, however Belarusian have a different pronunciation or accent. In fact when the presenter in this video switched on the Belorusian Tv, i first thought the lady was speaking Ukrainian😆, and then I started to wonder why her accent is different until I realised after a few seconds it was Belarusian. And when I first was in Poland I had such a dejauvea - like I was in Kyiv or Lviv, but the signs have Ukrainian words written in Latin letters. There is definitely way more difference between Ukrainian and Russian than Ukrainian and Belarusian / Polish
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 2 ай бұрын
@love_for_travel thanks so much for sharing your experiences
@MLiv-bn4cl
@MLiv-bn4cl 3 ай бұрын
I was raised in Ukraine, in Kharkiv, but I never spoke and even very rarely heard Ukrainian. My mother tongue was Russian. Only after the war in Ukraine started I have started to listen and read Ukrainian news and shows. So now I understand 99% of Ukrainian, although I can’t speak it, because I live in the USA and I don’t have anyone to speak it with
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Russian was also dominant when I was in Ukraine during Soviet times.
@xxxyyy8779
@xxxyyy8779 3 ай бұрын
​@@polyglotdreamsmaybe because Kharkov is a Russian city given to the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic by bloody Communists?
@xxxyyy8779
@xxxyyy8779 3 ай бұрын
There's a nice Russian word for someone like you - вырусь.
@radestankovic6884
@radestankovic6884 2 ай бұрын
@@polyglotdreams "Ukrainian language" is mix of polish and Russian or transitional variation as I understand, similar as serbo-croatian as transition between northern Slavic and Balcanian prothoromanic!
@yevgenkubichka7273
@yevgenkubichka7273 3 ай бұрын
Great video, just wanted to mention that unlike mentioned in 23:27, Ukrainian also has 7 grammatical cases, vocative exists too (Клична форма)
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Yes.. thanks my mistake
@igorsajn6246
@igorsajn6246 2 ай бұрын
And Slovenian doesn’t have vocative, so 6 cases only.
@LukasTinkl
@LukasTinkl Ай бұрын
Neither Slovak has the vocative
@thesquid1187
@thesquid1187 10 күн бұрын
I'm an American who first learned Russian close to fluent, then learned Polish to an intermediate level. Now I'm living in Montenegro for a few months and thinking about starting to learn Serbian, hence why I'm watching videos like yours. Good to know we're on the same page as to which Slavic languages to learn and in which order. haha
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 10 күн бұрын
Exactly... all the best to you.
@sandwichbreath0
@sandwichbreath0 3 ай бұрын
I've been learning Russian the last year or two, and have wondered whether it would let me branch into other Slavic languages later. I have such a better understanding of its relation to al its linguistic neighbors now after this video. Guess it'll be Polish for me next! I landed here after stumbling on your video about the CN/KR/JP/VT crossovers. What a great channel! I've just subscribed!
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Thank you so much for your support. I love the Slavic languages so I continue to work on them as often as I can and visit the Slavic nations... going again in May.
@anatoliypankevych4853
@anatoliypankevych4853 3 ай бұрын
It won’t. Everyone understands russian , because of the russian occupational politics, but russians , knowing only their language, understand no one. There’s literally little similarities in real life languages between pussian and other Slav languages.
@DeadnWoon
@DeadnWoon 3 ай бұрын
Russian was widely studied in the times of the USSR in all European USSR-controlled/allied countries. Given that, if you know Russian language, at least lots of old enough people in those countries would be able to communicate with you. It doesn't mean they will be glad to speak or hear Russian (due to political, nationalist, ideological reasons), but sure Russian is the most useful one. As for branching into, the cases are the same and case endings are similar more or less. The same three grammatical genders. Basic vocabulary is often the same, as well. More or less the same sounds.
@sandwichbreath0
@sandwichbreath0 2 ай бұрын
@@DeadnWoon Excellent!
@DeadnWoon
@DeadnWoon 2 ай бұрын
@@sandwichbreath0 In some situations, Russian gets useful in the most unexpected places. For example, there's an American sci-fi writer Robert Sheckley who wrote tons of great short stories and several memorable novels. He is largely forgotten in the USA, but is considered a cult, legendary classic in the USSR and post-Soviet countries like Russia, Ukraine, etc. You can easily find 90+% of his works in Russian (for free in the internet libraries or for adequate money on paper), but hardly so in his native English. I think, Polish will definitely be a good choice, too. A very rich culture, songs, poetry.
@angelferrandis6089
@angelferrandis6089 3 ай бұрын
I'm here to solve this even better: LEARN INTERSLAVIC, a constructed language that all slavs can understand and is easier for learning than all of the national Slavic languages. I'm not slav but I am studying it, is a highly valuable language.
@theoldmoneyss
@theoldmoneyss 3 ай бұрын
How do you study it? I can't find any sources. Please share
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Certainly, many Slavic speakers can understand Interslavic, but it doesn't mean you will be able to understand all the Slavic languages.
@milakarneeva
@milakarneeva 2 ай бұрын
Есть церковнославянский язык, который является чем-то средним между всеми славянскими языками
@lukebruce5234
@lukebruce5234 22 күн бұрын
most useless "language" ever just learn Russian
@user-pj8ji5df5k
@user-pj8ji5df5k 3 ай бұрын
Apparently, it doesn't work with all Slavic languages, but most of the neighboring languages ​​can be learned without any effort just by consuming the content. That's true. I am Ukrainian and I understand the Polish language very well, although I have never even studied it. Czech and Slovak are a little more difficult for me, because there is much less of it in our information field, but after watching a few videos I started to understand about 70 percent of what they say. With the Belarusian language, everything is generally so easy to understand that sometimes, if I hear a song in this language, I cannot immediately understand that it is foreign, because our languages, although different, have high mutual inteligibility, not like with russian.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Yes for speakers of one or two Slavic languages usually with exposure we begin to understand other Slavic languages quite naturally
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Yes you can learn a lot just through exposure to comprehensible input in other Slavic languages when you know one or more Slavic languages
@jakjak9472
@jakjak9472 17 күн бұрын
It’s great Tim that you’ve decided to start your channel, you’ve got some knowledge to share
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 13 күн бұрын
Glad you think so!
@Akrus15
@Akrus15 2 күн бұрын
I speak Russian fluently and I worked 6 years in a Polish company so I learned polish there. And im married to a Serbian woman and there have intermediate knowledge of Serbian, which is the perfect mix to understand all Slavs to at least 60-70%.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 2 күн бұрын
Fantastic!
@johnbosko6190
@johnbosko6190 3 ай бұрын
Extensive knowledge which involves linguistics, culture, politics, history and geography. Thans very much.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
I just love it when people like you can appreciate such content. THANKS
@bigodoyf
@bigodoyf 3 ай бұрын
É muito gostoso ver sua paixão pelas linguas! Estou adorando seus vídeos e tem me animado para estudar mais. No momento estou tentando ficar proficiente em ingles, e aprender o básico do russo. E se eu continuar no gás, depois gostaria de saber alemão haha. Grande abraço do Brasil! E obrigado por compartilhar tanto conhecimento.
@OzkAltBldgCo-bv8tt
@OzkAltBldgCo-bv8tt 3 ай бұрын
Clozemaster
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Muito obrigado pelo seu apoio e pelas palavras gentis! Fico extremamente feliz em saber que meus vídeos têm sido uma fonte de inspiração para você continuar seus estudos de línguas. Sua dedicação em aprimorar o inglês e começar a aprender russo é realmente admirável, e tenho certeza de que você também terá sucesso no alemão se mantiver essa paixão e determinação. Lembre-se, cada nova língua é uma nova janela para o mundo. Grande abraço e muito sucesso na sua jornada linguística! Continue assim e obrigado por fazer parte da nossa comunidade de entusiastas de línguas!
@danielsykes7558
@danielsykes7558 3 ай бұрын
Eu adoro português. É meu segundo linguagem (after French, before German) My native tongue is English. Bom Dia ❤️
@MrHiratv
@MrHiratv Ай бұрын
What an amazing video! Very well explained, structured and with examples. This of course encourages me to keep learning languages, and now I know a proper sequence for understanding most of them. Claps!
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams Ай бұрын
Awesome, thanks for sharing.
@aleksandarilic7666
@aleksandarilic7666 2 ай бұрын
As someone who first learned to speak using a dialect of South Serbia the Čital form in Slovakian is the same in Svrljisko Zaplanjski. Out of all the West Slavic languages I understand Slovak the most - Id say even more than any Eastern Slavic language as well. Na Kralove Holi, Stoji strom zeleni! :)
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 2 ай бұрын
That's very interesting... thanks.
@cond.oriano4945
@cond.oriano4945 3 ай бұрын
My first slavic lagnauge I'm tackling is polish. I mostly know Spanish and Italian to conversational level and currently focusing on Hungarian, Portuguese and Polish. And I feel I want to tackle czech and ukranian after russian and polish because I feel I would visit those countries more often and it'll be more useful to me.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Awesome... all the best in your quest
@cond.oriano4945
@cond.oriano4945 3 ай бұрын
@@polyglotdreams for learning is building vocabulary the most important thing to study first instead of grammar or accent?
@isajloskidarko
@isajloskidarko 2 ай бұрын
As Macedonian I would argue :) We Macedonians can understand anyone from Bulgaria to Croatia without a problem. But all of them, including Bulgarians have truble understanding us ;) After all, Ohrid is in Macedonia, isnt it? ;)
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 2 ай бұрын
Thank you for sharing your experience.
@PerdoSanchez-st8ib
@PerdoSanchez-st8ib 8 күн бұрын
Да бе, да. Македонския е просто един диалект с добавени сръбски думи. Какъв проблем имаме за да го разбираме?
@gamermapper
@gamermapper 2 ай бұрын
It's amazing that you show I Love Languages channel. Her channel truly is amazing!!! 🥰
@archienoyce2453
@archienoyce2453 3 ай бұрын
i dont think ive been this engrossed in a youtube video in a very long time, incredible video thank you so much for sharing your knowledge! anymore content related to the slavic languages (especially regarding political history as you seem to have an interest in that?) would be fantastic if you are willing to make more (and if there is already some I apologise, I am new to the channel) as a non-native slavic language speaker you have greatly inspired me, I am very glad I have found your channel
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Thank you so much for that positive input. As you can see the history is very controversial, so i will do some more later, but i need to let it cool for a while before getting into more deeply. Welcome 🙏 to the community.
@mirnideca
@mirnideca 3 ай бұрын
Great video! I am Macedonian, I speak excellent Serbo-Croat, have learned some Slovenian, understand at least 60% of Bulgarian, speak also English and German... Choosing the next one - it will, most probably be Polish 🙂
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
AWESOME... I just live Slavic languages and cultures.
@kirrausanov
@kirrausanov 3 ай бұрын
How do the collective West implement "divide et impera" policy among the Slavic peoples? "If you put 100 black ants and 100 red ants in a jar, nothing happens. But if you shake the jar hard, the ants will start killing each other. The reds will think of the blacks as their enemies, and the blacks will think of the reds as their enemies. The real enemy is the one who shakes the jar. That's what happens in human society. So before people attack each other, we should think about who shook the can!". © Otto von Bismarck
@bosnjakizbosne7172
@bosnjakizbosne7172 3 ай бұрын
Do you know Bosnian language?
@kirrausanov
@kirrausanov 3 ай бұрын
@@bosnjakizbosne7172 Ne, on govori samo crnogorski. Ali to nije problem. Covjek moze da nabavi crnogorsko-bosanski rjecnik.
@bosnjakizbosne7172
@bosnjakizbosne7172 3 ай бұрын
@@kirrausanov Ja sam pitao njega, ako tebi treba bosansko-engleski rijecnik rado cu ti dati.
@GjokoPargo
@GjokoPargo 3 ай бұрын
Actually, if you want to learn only one language and be able to converse with any Slav, you need to learn Interslav.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Yes, that is true, but i wanted to focus on the natural languages, and if you only know Interslavic, you have a hard time understanding the responses of the people you are conversing with.
@pracantbruh
@pracantbruh 3 ай бұрын
very well made video. keep it up🔥🔥🔥
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Thanks... I will keep doing my best...
@James-sq7hr
@James-sq7hr 3 ай бұрын
Thank you! I Took Russian in school (& I followed it up later w/ the study of Church Slavonic), then I started getting into Polish, & I bought books on Bulgarian (but haven't had time to get into this one too much, yet), & I was thinking of learning Serbo-Croation or Slovene; this video 1) confirmed that I happened to have gotten into some of the most useful ones already, & 2) helped narrow down any of my possible options for further studies in the Slavic languages.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Fantastic... I am pleased that it has been so helpful.
@whambamglambam
@whambamglambam 2 ай бұрын
This was a very informative, interesting video! I have recently started learning Slovene due to an interest in music from there. It has been quite a challenge as my first Slavic language.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 2 ай бұрын
That's great! Challenging at first.
@brrrbrrr113
@brrrbrrr113 3 ай бұрын
what a video man, fantastic
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Much appreciated!
@amiwho3464
@amiwho3464 3 ай бұрын
Wow, excellent presentation! This topic is well known to me but I stayed all the way because of your presentation. I subbed because you inspired me. I wish you all the best in your journey through life!
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Awesome, thank you! Welcome to the community!
@romanotogliatirol8929
@romanotogliatirol8929 2 ай бұрын
Thank you very much indeed, dear Professor, for this very enjoyable video ! Your explanations are extremely clear, complete and simple to understand, in consideration of the topics you have dealt with. Thank you !
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 2 ай бұрын
Thanks so much for encouraging me.
@mskiptr
@mskiptr 3 ай бұрын
And here I am, watching the whole video simply to learn _about_ other Slavic languages. (I'm not learning any of them)
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Great... I am pleased that it interests you.
@danielsykes7558
@danielsykes7558 3 ай бұрын
Summed suggestions: East: Russian West: Polish South: BCMS (Also, if anyone is wondering discussion of starting southern languages is at 19:30 though there is an earlier aside around 14-15)
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
THANKS
@hata6290
@hata6290 14 күн бұрын
Omg, giving a list of the most spoken/applicable language of each branch of the family tree is so helpful, thank you :) this is what I’ve been trying to figure out
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 13 күн бұрын
You're so welcome!
@RichieLarpa
@RichieLarpa 3 ай бұрын
As a Czech, I personally speak 5 Slavic languages (Czech, Polish, Slovenian, Serbian, Russian) and such logic has been familiar to me before, as it is logical that all languages in one group are similar to each other. At this point, if I know the nationality of a Slavic person, I never speak English to them, since I am able to conversate with them naturally. But I have biggest trouble with Bulgarian, since in spoken form, it is really hard to understand, yet thanks to knowledge of Russian, written form is fine and I can catch the context most of the time. The problem is that since English is everywhere and it is both positively and negatively influencial to young generation, people will rather respond in English after spotting one tiny mistake or a little shift from an accent, which I find annoying, useless and sad. And to this day, I wonder what makes them "go full English" with no chance to go back? I learned Slavic languages to learn about cultures and to make conversations with Slavic people easier. What makes them automatically switch to a language that is unnatural for both, hence making our conversations even more harder, where sometimes I must speak even slowly, since somebody's English is plain horrible (something like "hotel is this, go street, then shop, go next")? That is something that does not make even sense for me and it starts to make me really disappointed.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
I am in complete agreement with what you are saying
@RichieLarpa
@RichieLarpa 3 ай бұрын
@@polyglotdreams That is better than nothing, thank you for your honest approach and good luck in your linguistic journeys!
@annaromanova5083
@annaromanova5083 3 ай бұрын
I'm from Belarus, born and raised in Minsk. But my native language is Russian. Of coarse I understand Belarusian. It's is learned here at schools as compulsory subject. But telling you the truth you can hardly meet any Belarusian on the streets speaking fluent Belarusian. The overwhelming majority speaks Russian in their daily life. I can easily understand Ukrainian and also understand a little bit of Polish.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
I hope the Belarusian language can survive!
@frostflower5555
@frostflower5555 3 ай бұрын
What's the difference between BelaRusian and Russian? I think the word Bela meant something because there used to be BelaSerbi and BelaChroatia - sorry have to go find the exact terms lol.
@lexasss
@lexasss 3 ай бұрын
@@frostflower5555, Most likely "Bela" means "West" as it is known from the history that world sides were associated with colors sometimes, though there are still debates on this topic.
@Ernest-cv3cu
@Ernest-cv3cu 3 ай бұрын
Есть мнение что когда варяги-викинги основывали Русь они плавали по системе рек и в каждом регионе Русси преобладали свой цвет красителей одежды, ну типа красная Русь чёрная Русь .
@user-wi4tn1yd6z
@user-wi4tn1yd6z 3 ай бұрын
@@Ernest-cv3cuце маячня
@YuriRadavchuk
@YuriRadavchuk 3 ай бұрын
Amazing summary for Ukrainian/East Slavic native. I came to the same conclusions by spontaneous understanding Polish, and other languages becoming intelligible. So far, South Slavic are a bit more challenging. Small fix, Ukrainian had Vocative case
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Fantastic... and yes, my mistake about the vocative case.
@tatiyanazzz
@tatiyanazzz Ай бұрын
Russian is my native language. Serbo-Croatian was my major at the Slavic languages department, Polish was the second foreign Slavic language. Though I know Polish poorly, it helps me with other languages. Now I can understand on a very high level any Slavic language. Czech and Slovak to a lesser extent, but others... But I must say I now speak Serbian as a native, so the Southern branch is really easy. The Eastern is easy too for obvious reasons (all the things that are different from Russian in Ukrainian and Belarusian basically come from Polish). Slavic languages are the best❤
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams Ай бұрын
Thanks for sharing your experiences and insights.
@user-pb5yg9qz9q
@user-pb5yg9qz9q 2 ай бұрын
It's really rare to find belorussian speaker in belarus now on the streets, normally Russian is used
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 2 ай бұрын
Yes... I hope the language survives.
@shwabb1
@shwabb1 3 ай бұрын
7:22 Belarusian, not Belarussian. The second version stems from the Imperial and Soviet ideas that Belarusians and Ukrainians originated from Russians (which is in reality false) - the same thing that Putin is currently saying basically. The difference of Rusian (Ruthenian) vs Russian might not look significant but it's a big deal for many Belarusians.
@Sweetie2077
@Sweetie2077 3 ай бұрын
Поплачь
@shwabb1
@shwabb1 3 ай бұрын
@@Sweetie2077 іди за кораблем
@andreidubovik9797
@andreidubovik9797 3 ай бұрын
As native I speak Belarusian and Russian. Also I leaved one year in Ukraine and learnt it language a little bit - lexically it very similar to Belarussian but quite different phonetically. In fact Belarusian phonetically is most closest Eastern-Slavic language to Polish: the same sounds 'cz', 'szcz' etc. Regarding the number of speakers unfortunately our country for a long time had been under huge impact of russification and in real life Belarusian use about 5% of population. This situation in Kyiv from soviet time what was described in the video was quite common in Minsk in the late 90s and even in early 2000s. And for now unpleasant political situation in our country has bad influence on it. When I came to Poland I noticed that almost 80% of Polish words exist either in Belarusian, Russian or Ukranian. But Polish has quite complicated grammar and understand it on the spot knowing only East-Slavik languges (even three of them) is almost impossible. But learning basic grammar and some vocabulary I can easy understand Polish. And Polish people understand me quite good despite I speak on mix of Polish-Belarissian and using just basic Polish grammar.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
That is very interesting thank you for sharing that.
@andreidubovik9797
@andreidubovik9797 3 ай бұрын
@@polyglotdreams by the way did you know about Polesian? Some tends to recognise it like separate language. This region mostly belongs to Belarus and it is considered like diallect of Belarusian. But with the very same result we can tell that it is the diallect of Ucranian. And it has its own lexics and phonetically really very close to Ucranian. But people considered themselves mostly as Belarusians.
@bobstone0
@bobstone0 2 ай бұрын
Finally a real comment. Polish, Russian and Belarusian are different languages and you need to put in effort to learn the other one. When I hear someone with no education say that they understand 90% of the language, 100% of the opposite language, I shake my head and think that this person doesn't know what he's talking about.
@SoullessMadness
@SoullessMadness 4 күн бұрын
A few years ago I went to work to Alaska, for the 1st time, at one of the many seafoods processing plants located over there. My expectations were, that I was going to be working among Hispanics and Americans. Inwardly, my jaw dropped when I quickly realized that over 80% of the hired workforce during that season, were people from former Yugoslavia and former Soviet Satellite States of the Eastern Bloc. Long story short I was fascinated and so, me wanting to learn Serbian I ended up picking up Russian because is the most accessible language to practice through the entertainment that is easily available and also because two different Ukrainians (A guy I've met while I was in Alaska, the other, a woman I've met while I was back home), suggested that should learn Russian first. Now I am doing just that and once in a while I roam around these types of videos.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 2 күн бұрын
Great... Slavic languages are fascinating
@RomanII499
@RomanII499 3 ай бұрын
I also noticed you said there are only 70,000 Rusyns. There are over 1 million of us.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Great the more the merrier
@myhal-bavyt
@myhal-bavyt 2 ай бұрын
70k is a number pulled out of official censuses. Due to the legal status of Rusyns in Ukraine, it was not, and is not really possible to get an accurate number of speakers, only the assumptions and estimations.
@milangacik994
@milangacik994 2 ай бұрын
Well protected in Slovakia.
@alexbrown2401
@alexbrown2401 Ай бұрын
and where are you?
@RomanII499
@RomanII499 Ай бұрын
@@alexbrown2401 In Zakarpattia
@Georgnac
@Georgnac 3 ай бұрын
No idea if anyone mentioned this yet, but Ukrainian does have the vocative case! Literary Standard Ukrainian requires it, and some spoken dialects still retain it completely. While the usage of vocative in spoken informal language is slowly fading away (mostly due to the influence of Russian), there are still situations when you would use it with people for your language to sound more natural. Hope this is at least somewhat interesting!
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Yes, thank you... I overlooked that.
@Georgnac
@Georgnac 3 ай бұрын
@@polyglotdreams No worries! Thank you for your video, it's one of the best I've seen on the subject!
@Fabiano2265
@Fabiano2265 Ай бұрын
What a fascinating video, thank you for sharing, I have really learnt something both new and valuable today.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams Ай бұрын
I'm very pleased to know... thanks
@noamavi4039
@noamavi4039 2 ай бұрын
thank you for this very informative video ❤
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 2 ай бұрын
You are so welcome!
@Balkanonymous
@Balkanonymous 2 ай бұрын
Great video. Born and raised in West Bulgaria with relatives in Macedonia (Skopje, Bitola) and Serbia (Pirot). Learned Russian at school 35 years ago. Recently tried to read беларуская мова (Belarusian language) and I am pretty positive about not only understanding the context, but some of the details. Not so much with Ukrainian, but still understanding the context. I do have troubles understanding and reading Polish. Reading Polish is a pain because of the different alphabet system they are using. However I am understanding the core of the text, not much when they are speaking. Especially if Polish is spoken in a fast way.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 2 ай бұрын
Thanks so much for sharing your experiences with Slavic languages
@gamermapper
@gamermapper 2 ай бұрын
Смешно потому что я русскоговорящий беларус но пока украинский понимаю лучше чем белорусский. В основном наверное потому что в интернете гораздо больше контента на украинском, что в сериалах что в соц сетях, чем на белорусском. Но и на белорусском достаточно, хорошо что это не как какой-то кашубский или лужицкий на котором вообще почти ничего нету.
@jozefkostelansky
@jozefkostelansky 2 ай бұрын
I am Slovak living in Slovakia. In my opinion Slovak language is a crossroad of all 3 types of Slavic langugages. Dialects in northern Slovakia are similar to Polish language (soft pronounciation - č, š, ť, ľ,), dialect in South Slovakia are similar to Slovenian and Croatian languages (hard pronounciation). And in eastern parts of Slovakia many people talk Rusin language. There is very interesting similarity between Slovakian and Slovenian languages. Both nations call their country Slovensko. In Slovenia there live Sloven(s), but in Slovakia a man is called Slovak, but woman Sloven(ka). It think, in the past we were one nation. Now there is Hungary between us. Very interesting is using letter "L" in Slavic languages. South languages use letter "U" instead of "L", e.g. vuk = vlk = volk. Polish language uses something with similar pronounciation, it is a special polish "Ł". In old dialect of Slovakia there was also used U instead of L: bou som = bol som, bucha = blcha etc. Small children, when they start to talk, often use this "U" instead of L. But In Slovakia using U instead of L is a speech error (similar like problems with R) and small children have to visit a logopedic expert to remove it. And one piece of interest. In Slovak language there is long R and long L: Ŕ and Ĺ, e.g. vŕtať, mŕtvy, vŕzgať, kŕdeľ, mĺkvy, vĺčok, hĺbka.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 2 ай бұрын
I have also read that in the past you were one nation.
@pityu2002
@pityu2002 2 ай бұрын
Sorry but dialects in south slovakia are extremely similar to Hungarian
@sebastianliancourt5200
@sebastianliancourt5200 2 ай бұрын
It's a great in-depth analysis . Big thanks for sharing. The first very detailed video I watched since Langfocus with paul
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 2 ай бұрын
Thank you so much.
@annanovikova5338
@annanovikova5338 2 ай бұрын
As Ukrainian/Russian speaking person I would say Belarusian, Rusyn, and Polish are the easiest ones (for me only). I was exposed to ukranian dialect as well, so some archaic constructions that ceased to exist in formal form but still exist in other langages were familiar to me. Now, when I started to learn Polish properly, it suddenly helped me with some Czech. A little bit. In written. Spoken czech, though, this is still quite a challenge, unlike Slovak, which is miraculously easy now. Southern slavic languages, oh, they are beautiful, but are quite a massacre still. In case with Polish, or Czech, or Slovak grammar is perfectly intuitive understandable even though some words meaning can be vague (like in Carroll's Jabberwocky). But all southern slavic have different nice surprizes as absence of cases (how to understand who did what to whom?), or weird cases endings if they exist, strange tenses (past perfect is okaish, you can find it in Ukrainian dialects, but aorist? what the hell is aorist?), and oh yes, articles. Some even deadlier than Polish clusters of consonants and tones come just as a bonus. As I've said they are beautiful, but for me require much, much more work than western group. (Ukrainian has 7 cases)
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 2 ай бұрын
Thanks for sharing... yes 7 cases my mistake
@chrisbunka
@chrisbunka 3 ай бұрын
Yep, I can vouch as someone who lives near one of Tim Keely's job experiences (I looked at his public CV provided through one of the links) that there are a lot of people of Polish descent in metro Detroit. Paczki Day is still very popular around here. As a side note unrelated to the video, there is a lot of interest in Japanese from the Millennials and Gen Z around here. Thanks for the video, Tim! 情報が役立って、見るのが楽しかったです。2月に入って、またロシア語の勉強をしようと思っています。
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Thanks so much. i lived in White Lake Township while working for GE.
@krzycho751
@krzycho751 3 ай бұрын
I've seen Paczki Day (or fat Thursday) being advertised in Massachusetts as well 😀 I'm glad you call it Paczki Day! How one can translate pączki as donuts? It's completely different thing 😉 Donut looks like a pączek of someone who believes that the earth is flat, with some dough stolen from the center! 😉
@chrisbunka
@chrisbunka 3 ай бұрын
@@polyglotdreams Yep. White Lake is still very much around today as it was then.
@chrisbunka
@chrisbunka 3 ай бұрын
@@krzycho751 I call it Paczki because all of our supermarkets around here call it that. Although not as prominent as perhaps 100 years ago, you can still see remnants of Polish influence around here, such as a Polish Cultural Center near the Japanese meetup I go to. Definitely many people with Polish family names!
@dresden_slowjog
@dresden_slowjog Ай бұрын
15:45 not 550.000 (spoken), the text correctly says 50.000. Other German sources count as little as 20.000 to 30.000 speakers. Upper Sorbian (in southeast Saxony, is closer to Czech) is "endangered of extinction". Lower Sorbian (closer to Polish, located further north, in south Brandenburg) is considered a "seriously endangered of extinction" language because it is only spoken in very few families by the middle and younger generations.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams Ай бұрын
Thanks for the input.
@stavfurman5311
@stavfurman5311 2 ай бұрын
As a Belarusian, I can add, that there are 2 versions of the Belarusian language: Narkamaūka and taraškievica. Narkamaũka was created during the Soviet era to make Belarusian more similar to Russian. The official dictionary was built on the base of Narkamaūka. Taraškievica has fewer similarities with Russian, with different pronouns in many words. Also, the Latin alphabet has an important part in the Belarusian language and history and if the Vilnius University was not closed during the Russian Empire time, Belarusian would be based on the Latin alphabet
@stavfurman5311
@stavfurman5311 2 ай бұрын
And please, do not use red and green flags, Belarusians hate it. It's a flag of the Lukashenko regime. Our historic flag is white red white, it's also a flag of free and democratic Belarus
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 2 ай бұрын
Yes... thanks, I didn't get to those details due to the length of the video.
@olegshtolc7245
@olegshtolc7245 Ай бұрын
@@stavfurman5311 литвина порвало. Сейчас бы 800тыс оппозиция за всех решала наш флаг
@sergiygryadushkin3056
@sergiygryadushkin3056 28 күн бұрын
@@olegshtolc7245 Hahaha. And he wrote this, of course, in russian. LOL
@olegshtolc7245
@olegshtolc7245 28 күн бұрын
@@sergiygryadushkin3056 а что, мне нельзя писать на русском? Какое-то новое правило в гайдлайне ютуба?
@wearealsohumans
@wearealsohumans 3 ай бұрын
Thank you. So, my native is Russian, and I have learned Polish a little. Maybe once I will learn Polish deeply, but right now I need German. I noticed that I understand pretty clear Belarusian (thanks to Belsat, I was waching it in a lithuanian prison), can understand and speak Ukrainian (maybe B1-B2) because of watching many many ukrainian videos. Polish was a challenge for me to listen, but now I understand it well. And that's true, across Europe I met many Poles and always tried to speak Polish, it is really useful! My favorite is, when a young woman is speaking Polish, it is better than music. I love Poland, I don't know why) The most difficult point with Slavic languages and Eastern Europe at all is... politics. Politics are everywhere. Mostly language indentity means something political. And it is very, very painful for me. The awful war is still going on. I was a human, but now I am a refugee in Lithuania. Everything from Russia is totally hated here, so I must hide my origin and I usually say I am Polish or I will be discriminated.
@xxxyyy8779
@xxxyyy8779 3 ай бұрын
😂😂😂😂😂
@wearealsohumans
@wearealsohumans 3 ай бұрын
And one more for you to discover what the politics here is! Once I said to my mom, that I love Poland and Polish people. And Polish girls are the best I have ever met (I am very young). And my mom answered - please no, I can agree with every choice your will date, but NOT from Poland, I promise she will hate us (my relatives) and all Russian at all. Why did she say it? No idea. But that's politics and its bad influence. I am more than a year "passportless" surviving in Eastern Europe, and Polish people always were welcome and tried to help me despite my "wrong" birthplace. I will never forget it.
@xxxyyy8779
@xxxyyy8779 3 ай бұрын
@@wearealsohumans 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Thanks so much for the comments... you can also see the controversy in the comments.
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Thank you for sharing that
@tselkovyy
@tselkovyy 3 ай бұрын
I was born in Siberian heart and spent 2-3 years in Kievan kindergarten being the only child who spoke Ukrainian with teachers. Of course i don't remember lot's of things and not good at speaking this language but as for me two easiest not Eastern languages are Bulgarian and Czechian. Bulgarian sounds and spoken almost the same as orthodox church priest in Russia (churchslavic), and Czech is a mix of English and our language. After this video i find out that Polish isn't that hard to understand if it isn't spoken fast. Thanks for the video
@polyglotdreams
@polyglotdreams 3 ай бұрын
Thanks for sharing your history
@nataliya6093
@nataliya6093 3 ай бұрын
this is because Muscovy was inhabited by a non-Slavic population and it was Slavicized due to the influence of the church - the old Bulgarian language.
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