ADHD in Girls and Women | Martha Barnard-Rae | TEDxKinjarling

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TEDx Talks

TEDx Talks

4 ай бұрын

After living undiagnosed with ADHD for 39yrs, Martha explores the reasons girls and women are underdiagnosed and her lived experiences before and after her 2021 diagnosis. Martha Barnard-Rae writes clear, convincing words for exacting humans. As a copywriter and owner of Word Candy, she specialises in personality and values-driven SEO copywriting for outside-the-box brands. Martha’s words live on the websites, blogs, videos, and emails of businesses all over Australia.
As a card-carrying Millennial, her career has evolved. But English teaching, corporate training, and copywriting are rooted in clear, engaging communication. Martha is a communicator through and through - and has always had a deep respect for the power of words.
This Canadian transplant is a life-long sun chaser. A voracious reader. An extroverted-extrovert with a penchant for social justice chats. She’s wife to a darling husband, mum to two lovely boys - and a sore loser of board games.
When Martha’s not crafting delicious words, you’ll find her walking two giant pooches, obsessing over her latest hobby, or wrapped around a cup of tea, planning her next Instagram reel. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at www.ted.com/tedx

Пікірлер: 1 231
Lily Vue
Lily Vue
It’s a privilege to be alive during a time where there are now women who speaks up for women’s health and not always men. This summarizes my life.
Khrystall Singleton
Khrystall Singleton
When she said “I’m not a bad mother, I’m not a terrible person, it’s not just a matter of trying harder” I replayed that part 10+ times. So much this. This is what I needed to hear!
Erin Walker
Erin Walker
When she teared up saying it's not just a matter of trying harder, I felt that. I haven't been diagnosed with ADHD but my parents used to punish me for "not paying attention," not remembering, and being generally "ditzy." I didn't have control over any of these things.
Elizabeth Paige
Elizabeth Paige
The most difficult part of my ADHD is becoming bored to the point where I end up feeling agitated. People, places and things can be boring. Over time I learned skills to combat boredom. I became an artist where hyper focusing is an asset. I started to exercise everyday, which calmed down agitation and anxiety. I started to wear headphones while I painted. Music shut out intrusive thoughts.
L S
L S
"Living a life in which you are trying so hard not to make mistakes and mess up times and get things wrong is exhausting."
surfingshewolf
surfingshewolf
Music is very powerful for those with ADHD because of how it lights up all areas of the brain and releases dopamine/endorphins, ESPECIALLY playing a musical instrument, which literally DOES light up the whole brain unlike anything else we know. Playing music helps me get things started, finished, helps shut out the non stop thinking and makes me feel capable and joyful. I've also learned that being in nature and staying active(but not in a gym. I surf and free dive)
Carrie Orta
Carrie Orta
That is the most beautiful and non-insulting definition of ADHD I have ever heard. Thank you.
Religious Stuttering Army Carnies
Religious Stuttering Army Carnies
Love this so much! I just got diagnosed with ADHD at 44 years old. I think I slipped through the cracks because I excelled academically, but when it came to executive functioning of managing the rest of life, it’s always been a struggle. I’m sad that I’m just now learning strategies to help but thankful for resources like this talk! ❤
L T
L T
PS I love the story on Google about how they needed brilliant thinkers so put all the applicants that were classic loner, unemployed, unable to fit in society in a waiting room with a couple weird gadgets and the place was a buzz for hours.
Boys Love Unrated
Boys Love Unrated
Very common mistake that people do when they see a person with ADHD failing is giving a "simple" task to them and saying "here, this is easy, even you should be able to do it". No. This is exactly what the person with ADHD can't do. And once they fail, people just assume they're being lazy and pretending this is hard. Simple is hard! It's usually boring, monotonous, not engaging at all. It's gonna be too frustrating. Even if we finish the task, we will never do it again - that's not the work we want or can do.
CW Ayres
CW Ayres
It's not a deficit, it's an over abundance of thoughts and not enough time to get it all done. The average person focuses on one thing at a time. I can focus on many things and get them all done if not interrupted. Being an honor roll student and an excellent worker is possible when limiting interruptions in your work day. Some of the greatest workers I ever dealt with had ADHD. Great talk!
Ellie Crabb
Ellie Crabb
That overwhelming urge to rip out your eyeballs and run out of the room in an unstimulating situation is so difficult to convey to people. It's not the boredom we all feel sometimes, it can almost be a physical pain at the idea of having to sit there.
JoAnn Turner
JoAnn Turner
Such a great talk! ADHD in girls and women is still not well enough understood, and it’s so under-diagnosed.
isRaven
isRaven
So, I’m a girl, but I was (I believe) self-diagnosed with ADHD from my mom. Just some random day once, she said “I think you have ADHD,” because my dad has ADHD, so I’m guessing I would act a bit like him sometimes. I have a medication for my ADHD, which, you guessed it, helps me focus more. (It also takes away a bit of my appetite.) But I feel like it does take me longer to do things in the morning and at night. I’ll admit, instead of getting dressed in the morning I usually tend to get distracted on my phone, and I’ve gotten in trouble so many times for that, but I absolutely hate that I don’t learn from these kinds of mistakes. Anybody else struggle with this? I’m also really glad to have a good friend of mine with ADHD, because we can basically relate to one another about having it. I think my ADHD is mainly the reason why I couldn’t finish a book and work for it in my ELA class when I was in 5th grade. I still struggle with finishing books today though. I fell behind in those, but I felt too scared to ask my parents for help. I would think they’d get mad at me, but I also knew they wouldn’t. This happened twice, and when it came to my last novel work, my mom and I worked on it every night. I don’t know why I’m saying all this personal stuff in a KZbin video comment, but I guess I think I’d like some people to relate to :)
Ayomide Fatunde
Ayomide Fatunde
I uncontrollably sobbed for most of this video just cause it felt so good to be seen and affirmed. Thank you so much Martha 💛
Sophie Waters
Sophie Waters
In 1997 I was 24, I tried to explain to a female boss that I had ADHD and she threw back her head and laughed , saying girls don't have ADHD. It's so rare that that's impossible. I had been professionally diagnosed several years before. She was the vice president of communication at an international company.
Pieri
Pieri
When there is hard thing to do, get them on board! That sums up the story of my life. We are the living representation of when there is a will there’s a way.
Toni Glick
Toni Glick
My daughter walked in as I was listening to this and thanked me for educating myself. We listened together, both of us nodding at all the descriptions. Everything mentioned here is a trait my daughter has. We are going to get her an assessment!
Patricia1234
Patricia1234
I so relate to this dear woman. I was not diagnosed until in my 60s despite asking doctors and therapists for years. I was diagnoses because I got a masters degree in clinical social work and diagnosed myself. Then I was able to explain to a therapist and doctor and finally got medical help. I appreciate Dr. Hallowell)s description, “Ferrari brain with bicycle brakes.”
MoonFairy929
MoonFairy929
I’ve just been diagnosed at 38 and it’s been a watershed moment of understanding for me.
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